The Psychopath Whisperer

The Psychopath Whisperer: The Science of Those Without Conscience by Kent A. Kiehl

My rating: 5 of 5 stars


I supposedly read this in 2014, but I have no memory of doing so. It may be that “rereading” this after seven years of schooling myself on psychopathy and true crime in general just made my brain take in the information differently.

Something in my reaction changed, certainly, because I gave this three stars in 2014, and this time around I was fascinated by Kiehl’s experiences and conclusions. If there is any flaw to the book, it is that Kiehl writes with a certain academic didacticness, but this is a guy writing to inform and persuade, not entertain. Still, if the question of “Why?” is what drove you to view and read true crime to begin with, this is an engaging read.




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Columbine

Columbine
by Dave Cullen

This was excellent. It based its portrayal not just on the facts of the events, but the facts of the emotional lives of the souls involved on all sides, even those whose claim to having a soul was tenuous. It made sense of the chaos with the benefit of a decade of hindsight and sought to teach the reader about the complexity behind every case of mass shootings we lump together as an epidemic of the same repeated tragedy. They’re not. I’ll admit morbid curiosity got me to read this, but I came away understanding a lot more about human reaction to the inexplicable. My only critique is it got a little long and dragged out towards the end.

Star Maker

Star MakerStar Maker by Olaf Stapledon

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is a stunning tour-de-force that I took on and was half way through before I realized HOW dated it was. I figured it was written in the mid-1960’s, given the level of knowledge the author possessed about the possibilities of the nature of alien life and the different species of astronomical objects he describes. I was staggered to find out it was published in 1937.

Does it read a little dated? Sure. The language is flowery and peppered with references to “Men” to describe every intelligent race. There is a narrative, but it is all told stream-of-consciousness without dialogue. “It was agreed among our party that we should continue further out into space.”

Reading this is a lot like looking at a painting by an abstract expressionist and shrugging it off until you realize it was painted when those artists were surrounded by Edwardian/Victorian stiffness as a style motif in design and popular art.

Olaf Stapledon was a true visionary–richly imaginative, but also writing a book decades beyond its time.

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